Episode #13 – ‘Multicoloured Mirrors – The Beatles Christmas Records’

At the suggestion of press officer Tony Barrow, The Beatles ended their first year of national fame by thanking the members of their UK fan club with a flexi-disc single containing a specially recorded Christmas message. So began an annual tradition that not only endured as long as they were together, but also mirrored and encapsulated their career: from the innocent fun of 1963 and 1964 to the biting cynicism of 1965, offbeat creativity of 1966, psychedelic surrealism of 1967, disparate contributions of 1968 and complete fragmentation of 1969. What starts off joyous ends up sad, with much of life in between – and guest appearances by George Martin, Mal Evans, Victor Spinetti, Yoko Ono and Tiny Tim.

Featuring:

  • “Christmas Time (Is Here Again)”
  • 1963: “The Beatles’ Christmas Record”
  • 1964: “Another Beatles Christmas Record” + outtakes
  • 1965: “The Beatles’ Third Christmas Record” + outtakes
  • 1966: “The Beatles’ Fourth Christmas Record: Everywhere It’s Christmas” + outtakes
  • 1967: “Christmas Time Is Here Again!”
  • 1968: “The Beatles’ 1968 Christmas Record”
  • 1969: “The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record: Happy Christmas 1969”
  • Dora Bryan – “All I Want for Christmas is a Beatle”

Episode #12: ‘’The Lennon and McCartney White Albums’ (live at Monmouth University)

This is a new phase STTS episode…

Essential to the concept of the ‘International White Album Symposium’ at Monmouth University, New Jersey, was that we recorded the show in front of an audience, revisiting and merging the much-discussed topics of Episodes #2 and #4 with a couple of our mates: celebrated Beatles author Mark Lewisohn and our resident musicologist Allan Kozinn.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney each contributed 12 songs to the White Album. These could have been justifiably issued as LPs in their own right. And what stunners they would have been; filled with an eclectic array of incredible compositions and unforgettable performances that captured both men—and their bandmates—at the top of their game.

Here we review the Lennon and McCartney White Albums, comparing them with each other as well as with the legendary, recently remixed Beatles opus. In comes the warmth and freshness of a live appearance, captured for you by the STTS team. Featured tracks:

  • Birthday
  • I’m So Tired
  • Julia
  • Dear Prudence
  • Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  • Back in the U.S.S.R.
  • Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?
  • Revolution

Episode #11: ‘White Heaven – Reviewing The Beatles Super Deluxe 50th Anniversary Edition’

A remixed White Album, the complete stereo Esher Demos, a wide array of high-quality, previously unheard outtakes… and the album in 5.1 surround. Need we say more? Actually, we do, according this historic release the attention and analysis it so richly deserves.

Featured tracks:

  • Helter Skelter (Second Version – take 17)
  • Yer Blues
  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • Blue Moon (Studio Jam)
  • (You’re So Square) Baby I Don’t Care (Studio Jam)
  • Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey (Unnunbered Rehearsal)
  • Revolution 1 (Take 18)
  • Good Night (Take 10 with a guitar part from Take 7)
  • Honey Pie (Instrumental Backing Track)
  • Dear Prudence (Esher Demo/Vocal, Guitar and Drums)
  • Let It Be (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
  • I’m So Tired (Take 14)
  • Sour Milk Sear (Esher Demo)

Episode #10: ‘Geoff Emerick – Channeling The Beatles’ Creativity’

A tribute to the recording engineer whose in-studio innovations helped shape The Beatles’ sound—and alter the course of popular music.

Geoffrey Emerick (born 5th December 1945, died 2nd October 2018) was just 16-years-old when, on 6th June 1962, he joined the EMI Studios on Abbey Road as a tape operator. Two days later, he attended the group’s first recording session with Ringo Starr on drums. He subsequently assisted on a number of sessions, including those for ‘She Loves You’ and ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’, before replacing Norman Smith as The Beatles’ chief engineer in early 1966 and diving straight into the deep end with the first track committed to tape for their landmark ‘Revolver’ LP: the revolutionary, now-legendary ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’. The following year, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ won him his first of four Grammy Awards.

In this episode, Richard, Erik, Allan and Craig examine how, together with producer George Martin, Geoff helped realize The Beatles’ most far-flung creative ambitions. And there is also an enlightening interview with multi-award-winning engineer John Kurlander, who assisted Geoff on the group’s final album, ‘Abbey Road’.

Featured Tracks

  • Tomorrow Never Knows (STTS remix)
  • Yer Blues
  • Good Day Sunshine
  • Good Morning Good Morning
  • Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End (STTS remix)
  • I’m Only Sleeping
  • A Day in the Life (STTS remix)

Episode #9: ‘The Beatles – Politically (In)Correct’

The cripple impersonations, the Nazi salutes, the MBEs (received and returned), the groupies, the ‘Butcher cover’, the ‘bigger than Jesus’ controversy, the drugs, the love anthem, the naked album cover, the politically-charged lyrics, the peace campaign, the erotic artwork… However we slice and dice The Beatles’ story, it’s never boring,. What they said, sang and did still incites heated debates and disagreements five decades later. And what was deemed acceptable or unimportant back in the 1960s is often judged far more harshly today—as well as the other way around. So, diving into this often amusing, sometimes disturbing topic, we appraise things according to not only current mores, but also the era in which they took place—guaranteeing an action-packed episode… and a splendid time for all.

The Music

  • I Saw Her Standing There
  • Day Tripper
  • The Word
  • Girl
  • Run for Your Life
  • Got to Get You into My Life
  • Tomorrow Never Knows
  • Doctor Robert
  • Penny Lane
  • Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds
  • A Day in the Life
  • All You Need is Love
  • Revolution 1
  • Blackbird
  • Piggies
  • No Pakistanis
  • Maggie Mae
  • I’ve Got a Feeling
  • Don’t Let Me Down
  • Give Peace a Chance
  • Come Together
  • You Can’t Do That
  • Across the Universe
  • Piggies
  • Happiness is a Warm Gun
  • Revolution
  • Commonwealth

Episode #8: ‘The Beatles’ Superstarr Drummer’

Rock-solid and understated, subtle yet ballsy, inventive and full of feel—these are just some of the descriptions that have been applied to the artistry and iconic, highly influential drumming of Sir Richard Starkey, M.B.E. Now, hot on the heels of Ringo’s 78th birthday, Richard, Erik, Allan, and Craig analyse and appraise his Beatles-related contributions behind the kit—both onstage and in the studio—while discussing his musical evolution, comparing him to his contemporaries, and assessing if he was indeed the man best suited to drum for the world’s greatest rock group.

Featured tracks:

  • Rain
  • Long Tall Sally
  • I Call Your Name
  • I Want to Hold Your Hand
  • She Loves You
  • Ticket to Ride
  • Please Please Me
  • Thank You Girl
  • I Feel Fine
  • You Can’t Do That
  • You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me
  • A Day in the Life
  • Long Long Long
  • The End
  • Good Morning Good Morning
  • Here Comes the Sun
  • I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Cry (Over You)

Episode #7: ‘Jesus and the Mob – The Beatles in the Windy City’

The Beatles played five shows in Chicago between 1964 and 1966—more than any other American city—and there was no little drama: from the total hysteria of their first gig at the International Amphitheater and staying at a Mob-run hotel during their second visit to kicking off their third and final tour with press conferences defending John’s “more popular than Jesus” remarks.

Re-live the excitement of those years via live Windy City performances by the Fab Four and on-the-spot interviews with fans, deejays, reporters, a concert promoter and a security guard, as well as the analysis of special guest Chuck Gunderson, author of the definitive two-volume ‘Some Fun Tonight! The Backstage Story of How The Beatles Rocked America: The Historic Tours of 1964 – 1966’.

Episode #6: ‘Beatles U.S. vs. Beatles U.K.’

Back in the 1960s, courtesy of Capitol Records executive Dave Dexter, Jr., American Beatles fans bought different records and often heard very different mixes to those enjoyed by their British counterparts: ones bathed in reverb and converted into fake stereo “with the assistance” of Mr. Dexter.

Those mixes have long since been eliminated from the catalogue, but they’re back with a vengeance in this show—and subjected to the scrutiny of Messrs. Taros, Buskin, Bartock and Kozinn as they discuss the pros, cons, and marketing strategies behind these alternately popular and egregious alterations to The Beatles’ music. What emerges is information that will enlighten listeners on both sides of the Atlantic—while jolting them with juxtaposed U.S. and U.K. mixes of some legendary tracks.

The Music

  • ‘Thank You Girl’
  • ‘I’ll Get You’
  • ‘I Call Your Name’
  • ‘You Can’t Do That’
  • ‘The Word’
  • ‘I’m Looking Through You’
  • ‘And I Love Her’
  • ‘She Loves You’
  • ‘Help!’
  • ‘She’s a Woman’
  • ‘I Feel Fine’
  • ‘I’m Only Sleeping’
  • ‘And Your Bird Can Sing’
  • ‘Doctor Robert’
  • ‘That Means a Lot’
  • ‘Long Tall Sally’
  • ‘Roll Over Beethoven’

Episode #5: ‘The Trip: from Rubber Soul to Revolver – How LSD Impacted The Beatles’.

“I don’t see too much difference between Rubber Soul and Revolver,” George said in the ‘Beatles Anthology’ documentary. “To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two.”

Many might think he should have paired Revolver with Sgt. Pepper. But, bearing in mind that George wasn’t nearly as involved with Pepper, let’s view things from his perspective…

In August 1965, John and George took acid intentionally for the first time, together with Ringo. In October and November, The Beatles recorded Rubber Soul. The following month, 10 days after the album’s release, a day after the end of the group’s final UK tour, Paul took LSD for the first time (with Guinness heir Tara Browne). Less than four months later, the Revolver sessions began.

Very different albums, but within just five months of one another: ‘Volume One’ shortly after three Beatles had dropped acid; ‘Volume Two’ after Paul had done so.

Featuring ear-catching, ultra-rare audio clips, this episode will dive deep into how hallucinogens influenced not only The Beatles’ songwriting and studio techniques during this period of unsurpassed group unity, but also the attitudes and instrumentation evident on record.

Episode #4: ‘The Profumo Affair – Sex, Lies… and Beatlemania’

Pimps, drug dealers, call girls, kinky orgies involving members of the ruling class, a government minister sharing a mistress with a Russian spy, a suicide… and the Prime Minister’s resignation. This was the scandal that rocked Britain in 1963—along with The Beatles simultaneously providing an alternative form of entertainment.

Among the featured tracks:

  • ‘From Russia with Love’ – Matt Monroe
  • ‘Do You Want to Know a Secret’ – Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas
  • ‘On the Rebound’ – Floyd Cramer
  • ‘Runaway’ – Del Shannon
  • ‘My Bonnie’ – Tony Sheridan & The Beatles
  • ‘You Don’t Know’ – Helen Shapiro
  • ‘Tower of Strength’ – Frankie Vaughan
  • ‘Come Outside’ – Mike Sarne with Wendy Richard
  • ‘Telstar’ – The Tornados
  • ‘All I Do is Dream’ – Mandy Rice-Davies
  • ‘Please Please Me’ – The Beatles
  • ‘Dance On’ – The Shadows
  • ‘Let’s Dance’ – Chris Montez
  • ‘Summer Holiday’ – Cliff Richard
  • ‘The Cruel Sea’ – The Dakotas
  • ‘How Do You Do It’ – Gerry and the Pacemakers
  • ‘From Me to You’ – The Beatles
  • ‘Confessin’ (That I Love You)’ – Frank Ifield
  • ‘(You’re The) Devil in Disguise’ – Elvis Presley
  • ‘She Loves You’ – The Beatles
  • ‘I’ll Get You’ (live) – The Beatles
  • ‘Nothing Has Been Proved’ – Dusty Springfield

PLUS ultra-rare clips of The Beatles performing at London’s Royal Albert Hall and Walthamstow Granada in the spring of 1963.